The Danish computer game support program, New Danish Screen, has been running for two years now handing out free money to promising Danish game developers on a bi-yearly basis. This Fall they handed out their last bag of money (now, a new political media agreement has to be negotiated in 2010).

We’ve had an excellent partnership with New Danish Screen, and are happy to announce that we are being awarded a development grant of 700.000 DKK (about $140.000) for our upcoming project Face-off in the Magic Circle.

Before I’ll give you some more info on our project, let me take some time to comment on a few of the other projects supported by New Danish Screen this Fall.

Blinded

Blinded is a crazy project I’m involved in. It’s a no-graphics 3D stealth action/adventure game about love, trust and deception. Apparently, after my involvement in Dark Room Sex Game, somebody must believe I have competences designing blind-games in general, so I have been hired to prototype and help design the game. The project is led by PortaPlay. I’m really looking forward to start fleshing out the game in more detail, especially the juicy parts of the relationship between the blind protagonist and the legless Russian spy, Veronica.

ICreature

ICreature is a virtual creature game for the IPhone. It is being developed by Tactile Entertainment, which was founded by a former ITU student, Asbjørn Søndergaard. Even though IPhone pets generally seem a bit cheesy (“last years next big thing”), I’m intrigued by the small tidbits they release on their blog.

I hope I’ll be able to sling the creature around in its tail, not just use the tail as a slingshot.
I hope I’ll be able to sling the creature around in its tail, not just use the tail as a slingshot.

Trainbombing

Trainbombing actually started as a bachelors project film from The Animation Workshop, an awesome animation school in Denmark. The guys decided that running around vandalizing trains and fleeing the police would make a great children game… I can’t wait to see the results.

Face-off in the Magic Circle

As Doug mentioned a few weeks ago, we are working on a gestural spell-fighting game for the Nintendo Wii. Our goal is to create a game where the players want to look at each other, not the screen. We imagine players standing in their living room, facing each other and making large wizardly gestures to sling spells at each other. To make this possible, we aim to minimize in-game visual feedback and instead communicate the game state through audio, haptics, and the player’s actual physical movements. This is not an easy task, given that audio and haptic feedback has such a low information bandwidth compared to visual feedback. Plus, it is very tricky to correctly detect and classify the player’s physical movements.

I’ll dig deeper into some of these problems in future posts. Until then, I’ll leave you with a little treat of early story/concept development, drawn by our very own game artist, Nils Deneken.

Early world/setting concept development of Face-off in the Magic Circle
Early world/setting concept development of Face-off in the Magic Circle