NORDIC GAME INDIE NIGHT 2015 OPEN CALL FOR GAMES

Nordic Indie Game Night 2014

Photograph by Gemma Thomson

We are pleased to announce the Nordic Game Indie Sensation Award 2015, the 6th annual Nordic Indie Night Showcase. In collaboration with the Nordic Game Conference we will showcase a number of talented and interesting indie developers from the Nordic countries.

If you have a game that you feel deserves some more recognition, we invite you to submit your game to this years Nordic Game Indie Night. Last year’s showcase featured some awesome games, and we look forward to seeing your game this year.

If your team is based in the Nordic region: Denmark, Finland, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, or the Åland Islands you can submit your game here. You don’t have to be ethnically Nordic and having part of your team based in a Nordic country is enough to qualify.

This year, for the first time we will be judging board games as well as digital games. Board games will be judged by a separate dedicated jury. If you have a hybrid game please choose the category you would like to be judged in.

We will provide travel and accommodation for one member of each selected games development team. This will be so you can receive your award and showcase your game.

If you are nominated it is important that at least one member of your team is able to attend the Nordic Game event from 20th – 22nd May in Malmö, Sweden. Please refrain from submitting an application if you know you will not be able to attend the event.

Digital Games

A jury of game developers, theorists, past winners and members of the Copenhagen Game Collective will look through all the submissions to narrow them down to a shortlist of the projects that the jury finds to be most interesting. After that CphGC will curate the final nominees to be showcased at Nordic game. These games will then be in the running for receiving the Nordic Game Indie Sensation Award 2015.

We are primarily looking for new projects but games that have already been released are OK, as long as they came out within the last year or so. Prototypes, work-in-progress, unfinished and unreleased games are also welcome to submit, and will not be treated differently from finished or released games.

The games that are selected will not be intended to be a list of the “Best Nordic Indie Games” but will instead celebrate the diversity of interesting projects that are being developed in the Nordic region.

Board Games

A team of Nordic curators, led by Thomas Vigild and Astrid Mie Refstrup, will play, evaluate and nominate 6 prototypes. These will be separate from the digital game curators and will have expertise centered around the board game market

The selected prototypes will be put in a room at Slagthuset and available for playtesting from Wednesday morning. The game designers are responsible for manning and presenting their games. At the end of the evening at Nordic Indie Night everyone can vote for their favorite Nordic Indie Nordic Board Game on display. The board game with the highest number of votes wins the Nordic Board Game Indie Sensation award during the Award Ceremony on Wednesday evening.

Participation is free. The board game has to be unpublished in order to participate in the board game section of NBGIN.

The designers behind the selected prototypes nominated will all receive one full pass to Nordic Game Conference per board game.
We do not accept print & play board games. If your game is print & play, the curators still need the physical prototype.

The board game does not have to be a finished and superbly polished visual design, but it should be able to communicate the basic rules and mechanics. Only prototypes developed in the Nordic region will be accepted. The developer has to register and send the physical prototype of the board game to the curators for evaluation. Send the prototypes to the following address:

Astrid Mie Refstrup
Tøndebindervej 2, 2 th
2400 Copenhagen NW
Denmark

Unfortunately we do not reimburse or cover postal expenses or return the submitted prototypes.

Speed Pitch for Digital Games

As part of the “Investing in Games” track in the main conference program of Nordic Game 2015, a Speed Pitch event is being organised on 20th May. This gives Nordic developers a unique chance to pitch their new game projects to a selected group of global investors and publishers. Digital games submitted to Nordic Game Indie Night this year have the opportunity to also apply for this through the same submission form. This will not be judged by the Copenhagen Game Collective, instead your submission will be reviewed by the conference organisers, and If selected, you will get a free entrance pass for the conference as well as support on how to prepare for the Speed Pitch event.

Submission

Deadline for submissions is 23:59 on the 16th March.

Please submit your games here.

More detailed program of the night will be announced later. (For further updates, watch this blog or follow us on Twitter).

Any other questions? Send us an email: ngin@cphgc.org

2013 – a retrospect

27

When I look back at 2013 I lose my breath. It has been a tremendously great year for us. Not in the sense of releasing professional games (albeit some of us have had some success in our companies with that. Read: KnapNok Games’ Spin the bottle and Cloud Chamber). But more in the sense of building community and experimenting with games and last but not least, just getting new experiences and meeting new people. Read more »

What motion control game development can teach us about Virtual Reality

Hi my name is Lau Korsgaard. I am a game designer involved with the Copenhagen Game Collective. Through the last five years I have been part of teams and projects that explored a wide range of the new interfaces for games, such as Wii Remotes, Balance Board, Dance Pad, Move Controllers, Kinect, Buzz buttons and heck, even our own custom hardware. This August I participated in IndieCade and Oculus Rift’s VRjam together with Sebbe Selvig and Simon Nielsen making the game Virtual Internet Hacker VR that took the first price and a 10,000 $ check among the invited developers. I would argue that lesson learned from years of development for motion controls can help us a lot in understanding development for virtual reality. I wouldn’t say that this perspective is the only way to make good virtual reality games, but I hope it will help nuance game developers understanding of what virtual reality can and cannot do.

Bring VR to Reality

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Games, Body Contact and Femminist Issues

This is an “answer” to Jordan Erica Webber and Laura Kate Dale’s series of letters published on IndieHaven and Godiva Gamers discussing the game called Hugatron (website and Tumblr). I am not affiliated with Hugatron in any way.

Dear Jordan and Laura

Thank you for sharing an insightful email conversation about your experiences watching a group of people playing Hugatron. Hugatron is a simple game where two random players are paired up and have to hug each other in an awkward way until one gives up and resign. Laura most strongly describes her discomfort early in your conversation:

Honestly, I was sat watching this group of men, being egged on and encouraged to make each other uncomfortable with physical contact and just felt really uneasy about the whole concept. Something about a supposedly social game that required players to make each other feel uncomfortable, then not complain about that discomfort for fear of losing just felt like it had some uncomfortable implications for social settings that may contain multiple genders/ sexual orientations/ levels of comfort with personal space etc.

Read more »

The Collective at Roskilde Festival

This year we’re going to Roskilde Festival to have fun and show some games.

We are going to show some of our games, while some of us are helping Invisible Playground with one of their more physical installation piece games; Giant Starfish Kraken, while some of us are helping out Die gute Fabrik of JS Joust fame with their games and installations (they have a game you play on trampolines!). We are looking forward to seeing the babycade being utilised for what it was intended and to show are physical games on it, together with some local multiplayer games. We are also showing our award winning “art game” Ervax to the festival audience. Going from high brow art exhibition to Roskilde Festival is going to be an interesting shift.

Besides our own games, we are also guest showcasing one of the Nordic Game Indie finalists’ local multiplayer game; the ever so funny Stikbold, which will be playable on the babycade with flying whale and all!

Where are all these shenanigans, you ask? Well, look for Game City, we will be in, and around that area.
Go inside and read about the games we’re bringing »

Excessive stimulation: GO NUTS!! at Wild Rumpus.

Almost 2 months ago, one of my games was selected for the Wild Rumpus party in London. I was lucky enough to be able to attend, and it was everything I had hoped for. I consider myself a rookie in the Copenhagen game scene, not to mention globally, and I only found out about Wild Rumpus a year ago. For those of you who have no idea:

The Wild Rumpus brings together the best of indie mutliplayer videogames for the most unique events of crazy, exuberant, social and sometimes physical gameplay. Our games line ups turn conventional videogame culture on its head. Closer in spirit to party, playground, or even drinking games, these are all games that you can’t play at home on your own. So come along and LET THE WILD RUMPUS START! – thewildrumpus.co.uk

When we made LAZA KNITEZ!!, we designed our video game to mimick some of the affordances of a foosball table, where the social situation and space are a key part of what makes the game compelling for a broad audience. Then when we built the Buttfighter, we asked ourselves: Can we get players of our game to stand around our video game in a public space, and can we get other people to pay attention to it?” This being our first video game, we started Googling so hard we almost poked a hole in the back of the internet. What we found was an emerging scene of independent developers feeling the same vibes. The Wild Rumpus seemed to be years ahead of anything else in terms of bringing these types of games to actual people, which is what they were intended for. They lift the burden of finding a space for people like you and me to go, where we can, at least for one night, pick up a controller and play a game of Samurai Gunn instead of a round of darts or foosball.

Not only do they provide you with the space, they do a marvelous job of curating and selecting games based on their accessibility, innovation, spectatorship, and the likelihood you’ll end up craving more.


Wild Rumpus – On a F**king Boat from Niall Henn on Vimeo.

Read more »

w00t w00t

The weekend has passed and so has the festival. We have had great response and a lot of fun running this festival. There were so many cool game talks people, boardgame people and cool game designers running their street games.

Playground

Festival area right before opening

I even had a friend not usually associating with games being there with his two little daughters having a lot of fun spying on people for speed guerilla gardening and creating hummingbirdmen. Great to see this kind of involvement too.

Image credit: Chad Toprak 2013 - mr-chad.com

Image credit: Chad Toprak 2013 – mr-chad.com

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We’re going to the Maldives – The games

Read about the background of this trip here.

We got the move controllers water-proofed and were excited to try our underwater idea. We thought of having an underwater minefield of floating move controllers. If you touched one, a chain reaction would start, and you would hear sounds played from above the water.

Ready to get wet

However, as soon as the move controllers were submerged, just a bit, they stopped working. Apparently the Bluetooth signal from the controllers is not strong enough to send through water. The medium is of course tougher than air to propagate in, but we did not think this would be an issue. Apparently it is. There went all under water ideas!

Luckily we made two new findings.

  1. The move controllers float and work while floating
  2. They start working again as soon as they emerge from the water! (As long as they have not been under for more than 5 sec, where the built in hardware disconnect kicks in)

These two findings together we thought was really cool and could be turned around from a bug to a feature. We figured out that we could count for updates in the code, where no there was no activity from the controller. If the duration is longer than a prescribed threshold (for us 0.5 second), then the controller had been submerged.
This got us to think about the games in another way, and even though an under water game would have been beautiful and atmospheric to play, being above water is more fun, since you can communicate and interact more with the other players.
Read more »

We’re going to the Maldives – Boat, water and island games

Read about the background of this trip here.

At our third day here we wanted to get to know the local culture more. We wanted to hear some local fairytales and folk stories. That’s why we arranged a get-together with some of the locals at a café on a Malé suburb – Villingili (it’s on another island, and you have to take a ferry to get there, but yes, it’s a “suburb”).

Telling stories to a crowd can be a bit daunting if you’re not used to it. I remembered a classic danish parlour game that my friend Anders Børup taught me. It is a collaborative storytelling game where people take turns at saying a word that is attached to the current sentence and then it goes around in a circle. Anyone can always end the sentence by saying “full stop” instead of a word, which then changes the direction and begins a new sentence. It is best played fast and to a specific rhythm. This forces people to not over-think and makes it more silly and fun.

Here is a sentence we built that I really love. It’s a bit non-sensical and aaaalmost poetic:

“Malé is unpleasantly humid, yes, this will destroy mother earth if we want all the passionfruit all in one mouthful.”

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We’re going to the Maldives – first days

Read about the background of this trip here.

The last couple of days we have been settling in. Getting to know the “island time” and meeting local people and Amani’s family. All very nice people.

I got to play a game with the locals that they claim is the predecessor of the other games in the same variant. The game is called Ohlvalhu Gondi and is a type of Kalaha/Mancala and is played sea shells called cowrie. The cowrie used to be their currency, so playing this game would have an element of gambling involved. The cowrie is also depicted on their really beautiful paper money as a legacy of their history.


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